Dr. Lisa M. Avery, MD
Neurologist

 

Dr. Lisa Avery MD completed her specialty training in Neurology at The Ohio State University in 2003. Dr. Avery’s first year of specialty training was spent at VCU School of Medicine, and during her time there, the professor and chair of the neurology department  Dr. Robert J. DeLorenzo, MD, PhD was the first to research marijuana and the brain's cannabinoid system in live animals with spontaneous, recurrent seizures. Dr. DeLorenzo's breakthrough research ignited Dr. Avery's interest in alternative approaches to neurological conditions. 

 

Prior to medical school, Dr. Avery spent several years working at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor as a researcher in clinical medicine:  This instilled a scientific and objective approach to the practice of medicine which was reinforced during Dr. Avery's  post-doctoral research in Alzheimer's disease at University of Rochester, Strong Memorial Hospital in Rochester, New York. Her highly analytical skills and objective approach have earned her a significant reputation as a medical-legal expert witness. Dr. Avery has testified in both in Federal and State courts, but is best known for Traumatic Brain Injury evaluation and has evaluated equivocal TBI cases in the Tampa Bay area for the NFL Concussion Lawsuit.

Research in Alzheimers

Dr. Avery first became involved with medical research at 19 years old while attending University of Michigan, Ann Arbor where she work in both the ECMO research lab and Surgical ICU metabolic lab of  Dr. Robert H Bartlett, MD for more than three years. Wanting to diversify her experience before applying for medical school, Dr. Avery then spent two years doing research in allergy and immunology.  

 

After completing medical school, Dr. Avery completed a post-doctoral research fellowship in Alzheimer's Disease with Dr. Charles Duffy, MD PhD, of Neurology at University of Rochester, New York. Dr. Avery's co-authored research article, Visual Mechanisms of Spatial Disorientation in Alzheimer's Disease, has been cited at least 123 times since its publication in 2001 in Cerebral Cortex. The pivotal findings laid the foundation for additional research and eventually led to FDA approval of a diagnostic tool for early detection of Alzheimer's disease.

 Traumatic Brain Injury

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